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io.c 95KB

block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: align bounce buffers to page The following sequence int fd = open(argv[1], O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_DIRECT, 0644); for (i = 0; i < 100000; i++) write(fd, buf, 4096); performs 5% better if buf is aligned to 4096 bytes. The difference is quite reliable. On the other hand we do not want at the moment to enforce bounce buffering if guest request is aligned to 512 bytes. The patch changes default bounce buffer optimal alignment to MAX(page size, 4k). 4k is chosen as maximal known sector size on real HDD. The justification of the performance improve is quite interesting. From the kernel point of view each request to the disk was split by two. This could be seen by blktrace like this: 9,0 11 1 0.000000000 11151 Q WS 312737792 + 1023 [qemu-img] 9,0 11 2 0.000007938 11151 Q WS 312738815 + 8 [qemu-img] 9,0 11 3 0.000030735 11151 Q WS 312738823 + 1016 [qemu-img] 9,0 11 4 0.000032482 11151 Q WS 312739839 + 8 [qemu-img] 9,0 11 5 0.000041379 11151 Q WS 312739847 + 1016 [qemu-img] 9,0 11 6 0.000042818 11151 Q WS 312740863 + 8 [qemu-img] 9,0 11 7 0.000051236 11151 Q WS 312740871 + 1017 [qemu-img] 9,0 5 1 0.169071519 11151 Q WS 312741888 + 1023 [qemu-img] After the patch the pattern becomes normal: 9,0 6 1 0.000000000 12422 Q WS 314834944 + 1024 [qemu-img] 9,0 6 2 0.000038527 12422 Q WS 314835968 + 1024 [qemu-img] 9,0 6 3 0.000072849 12422 Q WS 314836992 + 1024 [qemu-img] 9,0 6 4 0.000106276 12422 Q WS 314838016 + 1024 [qemu-img] and the amount of requests sent to disk (could be calculated counting number of lines in the output of blktrace) is reduced about 2 times. Both qemu-img and qemu-io are affected while qemu-kvm is not. The guest does his job well and real requests comes properly aligned (to page). Signed-off-by: Denis V. Lunev <den@openvz.org> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Message-id: 1431441056-26198-3-git-send-email-den@openvz.org CC: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> CC: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> CC: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
4 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix bdrv_drain in coroutine Using the nested aio_poll() in coroutine is a bad idea. This patch replaces the aio_poll loop in bdrv_drain with a BH, if called in coroutine. For example, the bdrv_drain() in mirror.c can hang when a guest issued request is pending on it in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). Mirror coroutine in this case has just finished a request, and the block job is about to complete. It calls bdrv_drain() which waits for the other coroutine to complete. The other coroutine is a scsi-disk request. The deadlock happens when the latter is in turn pending on the former to yield/terminate, in qemu_co_mutex_lock(). The state flow is as below (assuming a qcow2 image): mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain while (has tracked request) aio_poll() In the scsi-disk coroutine, the qemu_co_mutex_lock() will never return because the mirror coroutine is blocked in the aio_poll(blocking=true). With this patch, the added qemu_coroutine_yield() allows the scsi-disk coroutine to make progress as expected: mirror coroutine scsi-disk coroutine ------------------------------------------------------------- do last write qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock() ... scsi disk read tracked request begin qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.enter qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_unlock() bdrv_drain.enter > schedule BH > qemu_coroutine_yield() > qcow2:qemu_co_mutex_lock.return > ... tracked request end ... (resumed from BH callback) bdrv_drain.return ... Reported-by: Laurent Vivier <lvivier@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Message-id: 1459855253-5378-2-git-send-email-famz@redhat.com Suggested-by: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Fix hangs in synchronous APIs with iothreads In the block layer, synchronous APIs are often implemented by creating a coroutine that calls the asynchronous coroutine-based implementation and then waiting for completion with BDRV_POLL_WHILE(). For this to work with iothreads (more specifically, when the synchronous API is called in a thread that is not the home thread of the block device, so that the coroutine will run in a different thread), we must make sure to call aio_wait_kick() at the end of the operation. Many places are missing this, so that BDRV_POLL_WHILE() keeps hanging even if the condition has long become false. Note that bdrv_dec_in_flight() involves an aio_wait_kick() call. This corresponds to the BDRV_POLL_WHILE() in the drain functions, but it is generally not enough for most other operations because they haven't set the return value in the coroutine entry stub yet. To avoid race conditions there, we need to kick after setting the return value. The race window is small enough that the problem doesn't usually surface in the common path. However, it does surface and causes easily reproducible hangs if the operation can return early before even calling bdrv_inc/dec_in_flight, which many of them do (trivial error or no-op success paths). The bug in bdrv_truncate(), bdrv_check() and bdrv_invalidate_cache() is slightly different: These functions even neglected to schedule the coroutine in the home thread of the node. This avoids the hang, but is obviously wrong, too. Fix those to schedule the coroutine in the right AioContext in addition to adding aio_wait_kick() calls. Cc: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com>
11 months ago
block: Use bdrv_coroutine_enter to start I/O coroutines BDRV_POLL_WHILE waits for the started I/O by releasing bs's ctx then polling the main context, which relies on the yielded coroutine continuing on bs->ctx before notifying qemu_aio_context with bdrv_wakeup(). Thus, using qemu_coroutine_enter to start I/O is wrong because if the coroutine is entered from main loop, co->ctx will be qemu_aio_context, as a result of the "release, poll, acquire" loop of BDRV_POLL_WHILE, race conditions happen when both main thread and the iothread access the same BDS: main loop iothread ----------------------------------------------------------------------- blockdev_snapshot aio_context_acquire(bs->ctx) virtio_scsi_data_plane_handle_cmd bdrv_drained_begin(bs->ctx) bdrv_flush(bs) bdrv_co_flush(bs) aio_context_acquire(bs->ctx).enter ... qemu_coroutine_yield(co) BDRV_POLL_WHILE() aio_context_release(bs->ctx) aio_context_acquire(bs->ctx).return ... aio_co_wake(co) aio_poll(qemu_aio_context) ... co_schedule_bh_cb() ... qemu_coroutine_enter(co) ... /* (A) bdrv_co_flush(bs) /* (B) I/O on bs */ continues... */ aio_context_release(bs->ctx) aio_context_acquire(bs->ctx) Note that in above case, bdrv_drained_begin() doesn't do the "release, poll, acquire" in BDRV_POLL_WHILE, because bs->in_flight == 0. Fix this by using bdrv_coroutine_enter and enter coroutine in the right context. iotests 109 output is updated because the coroutine reenter flow during mirror job complete is different (now through co_queue_wakeup, instead of the unconditional qemu_coroutine_switch before), making the end job len different. Signed-off-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Honor BDRV_REQ_FUA during write_zeroes The block layer has a couple of cases where it can lose Force Unit Access semantics when writing a large block of zeroes, such that the request returns before the zeroes have been guaranteed to land on underlying media. SCSI does not support FUA during WRITESAME(10/16); FUA is only supported if it falls back to WRITE(10/16). But where the underlying device is new enough to not need a fallback, it means that any upper layer request with FUA semantics was silently ignoring BDRV_REQ_FUA. Conversely, NBD has situations where it can support FUA but not ZERO_WRITE; when that happens, the generic block layer fallback to bdrv_driver_pwritev() (or the older bdrv_co_writev() in qemu 2.6) was losing the FUA flag. The problem of losing flags unrelated to ZERO_WRITE has been latent in bdrv_co_do_write_zeroes() since commit aa7bfbff, but back then, it did not matter because there was no FUA flag. It became observable when commit 93f5e6d8 paved the way for flags that can impact correctness, when we should have been using bdrv_co_writev_flags() with modified flags. Compare to commit 9eeb6dd, which got flag manipulation right in bdrv_co_do_zero_pwritev(). Symptoms: I tested with qemu-io with default writethrough cache (which is supposed to use FUA semantics on every write), and targetted an NBD client connected to a server that intentionally did not advertise NBD_FLAG_SEND_FUA. When doing 'write 0 512', the NBD client sent two operations (NBD_CMD_WRITE then NBD_CMD_FLUSH) to get the fallback FUA semantics; but when doing 'write -z 0 512', the NBD client sent only NBD_CMD_WRITE. The fix is do to a cleanup bdrv_co_flush() at the end of the operation if any step in the middle relied on a BDS that does not natively support FUA for that step (note that we don't need to flush after every operation, if the operation is broken into chunks based on bounce-buffer sizing). Each BDS gains a new flag .supported_zero_flags, which parallels the use of .supported_write_flags but only when accessing a zero write operation (the flags MUST be different, because of SCSI having different semantics based on WRITE vs. WRITESAME; and also because BDRV_REQ_MAY_UNMAP only makes sense on zero writes). Also fix some documentation to describe -ENOTSUP semantics, particularly since iscsi depends on those semantics. Down the road, we may want to add a driver where its .bdrv_co_pwritev() honors all three of BDRV_REQ_FUA, BDRV_REQ_ZERO_WRITE, and BDRV_REQ_MAY_UNMAP, and advertise this via bs->supported_write_flags for blocks opened by that driver; such a driver should NOT supply .bdrv_co_write_zeroes nor .supported_zero_flags. But none of the drivers touched in this patch want to do that (the act of writing zeroes is different enough from normal writes to deserve a second callback). Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
3 years ago
block: Convert bdrv_get_block_status() to bytes We are gradually moving away from sector-based interfaces, towards byte-based. In the common case, allocation is unlikely to ever use values that are not naturally sector-aligned, but it is possible that byte-based values will let us be more precise about allocation at the end of an unaligned file that can do byte-based access. Changing the name of the function from bdrv_get_block_status() to bdrv_block_status() ensures that the compiler enforces that all callers are updated. For now, the io.c layer still assert()s that all callers are sector-aligned, but that can be relaxed when a later patch implements byte-based block status in the drivers. There was an inherent limitation in returning the offset via the return value: we only have room for BDRV_BLOCK_OFFSET_MASK bits, which means an offset can only be mapped for sector-aligned queries (or, if we declare that non-aligned input is at the same relative position modulo 512 of the answer), so the new interface also changes things to return the offset via output through a parameter by reference rather than mashed into the return value. We'll have some glue code that munges between the two styles until we finish converting all uses. For the most part this patch is just the addition of scaling at the callers followed by inverse scaling at bdrv_block_status(), coupled with the tweak in calling convention. But some code, particularly bdrv_is_allocated(), gets a lot simpler because it no longer has to mess with sectors. For ease of review, bdrv_get_block_status_above() will be tackled separately. Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Convert bdrv_get_block_status() to bytes We are gradually moving away from sector-based interfaces, towards byte-based. In the common case, allocation is unlikely to ever use values that are not naturally sector-aligned, but it is possible that byte-based values will let us be more precise about allocation at the end of an unaligned file that can do byte-based access. Changing the name of the function from bdrv_get_block_status() to bdrv_block_status() ensures that the compiler enforces that all callers are updated. For now, the io.c layer still assert()s that all callers are sector-aligned, but that can be relaxed when a later patch implements byte-based block status in the drivers. There was an inherent limitation in returning the offset via the return value: we only have room for BDRV_BLOCK_OFFSET_MASK bits, which means an offset can only be mapped for sector-aligned queries (or, if we declare that non-aligned input is at the same relative position modulo 512 of the answer), so the new interface also changes things to return the offset via output through a parameter by reference rather than mashed into the return value. We'll have some glue code that munges between the two styles until we finish converting all uses. For the most part this patch is just the addition of scaling at the callers followed by inverse scaling at bdrv_block_status(), coupled with the tweak in calling convention. But some code, particularly bdrv_is_allocated(), gets a lot simpler because it no longer has to mess with sectors. For ease of review, bdrv_get_block_status_above() will be tackled separately. Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Convert bdrv_get_block_status() to bytes We are gradually moving away from sector-based interfaces, towards byte-based. In the common case, allocation is unlikely to ever use values that are not naturally sector-aligned, but it is possible that byte-based values will let us be more precise about allocation at the end of an unaligned file that can do byte-based access. Changing the name of the function from bdrv_get_block_status() to bdrv_block_status() ensures that the compiler enforces that all callers are updated. For now, the io.c layer still assert()s that all callers are sector-aligned, but that can be relaxed when a later patch implements byte-based block status in the drivers. There was an inherent limitation in returning the offset via the return value: we only have room for BDRV_BLOCK_OFFSET_MASK bits, which means an offset can only be mapped for sector-aligned queries (or, if we declare that non-aligned input is at the same relative position modulo 512 of the answer), so the new interface also changes things to return the offset via output through a parameter by reference rather than mashed into the return value. We'll have some glue code that munges between the two styles until we finish converting all uses. For the most part this patch is just the addition of scaling at the callers followed by inverse scaling at bdrv_block_status(), coupled with the tweak in calling convention. But some code, particularly bdrv_is_allocated(), gets a lot simpler because it no longer has to mess with sectors. For ease of review, bdrv_get_block_status_above() will be tackled separately. Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Convert bdrv_get_block_status() to bytes We are gradually moving away from sector-based interfaces, towards byte-based. In the common case, allocation is unlikely to ever use values that are not naturally sector-aligned, but it is possible that byte-based values will let us be more precise about allocation at the end of an unaligned file that can do byte-based access. Changing the name of the function from bdrv_get_block_status() to bdrv_block_status() ensures that the compiler enforces that all callers are updated. For now, the io.c layer still assert()s that all callers are sector-aligned, but that can be relaxed when a later patch implements byte-based block status in the drivers. There was an inherent limitation in returning the offset via the return value: we only have room for BDRV_BLOCK_OFFSET_MASK bits, which means an offset can only be mapped for sector-aligned queries (or, if we declare that non-aligned input is at the same relative position modulo 512 of the answer), so the new interface also changes things to return the offset via output through a parameter by reference rather than mashed into the return value. We'll have some glue code that munges between the two styles until we finish converting all uses. For the most part this patch is just the addition of scaling at the callers followed by inverse scaling at bdrv_block_status(), coupled with the tweak in calling convention. But some code, particularly bdrv_is_allocated(), gets a lot simpler because it no longer has to mess with sectors. For ease of review, bdrv_get_block_status_above() will be tackled separately. Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Convert bdrv_get_block_status() to bytes We are gradually moving away from sector-based interfaces, towards byte-based. In the common case, allocation is unlikely to ever use values that are not naturally sector-aligned, but it is possible that byte-based values will let us be more precise about allocation at the end of an unaligned file that can do byte-based access. Changing the name of the function from bdrv_get_block_status() to bdrv_block_status() ensures that the compiler enforces that all callers are updated. For now, the io.c layer still assert()s that all callers are sector-aligned, but that can be relaxed when a later patch implements byte-based block status in the drivers. There was an inherent limitation in returning the offset via the return value: we only have room for BDRV_BLOCK_OFFSET_MASK bits, which means an offset can only be mapped for sector-aligned queries (or, if we declare that non-aligned input is at the same relative position modulo 512 of the answer), so the new interface also changes things to return the offset via output through a parameter by reference rather than mashed into the return value. We'll have some glue code that munges between the two styles until we finish converting all uses. For the most part this patch is just the addition of scaling at the callers followed by inverse scaling at bdrv_block_status(), coupled with the tweak in calling convention. But some code, particularly bdrv_is_allocated(), gets a lot simpler because it no longer has to mess with sectors. For ease of review, bdrv_get_block_status_above() will be tackled separately. Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Perform copy-on-read in loop Improve our braindead copy-on-read implementation. Pre-patch, we have multiple issues: - we create a bounce buffer and perform a write for the entire request, even if the active image already has 99% of the clusters occupied, and really only needs to copy-on-read the remaining 1% of the clusters - our bounce buffer was as large as the read request, and can needlessly exhaust our memory by using double the memory of the request size (the original request plus our bounce buffer), rather than a capped maximum overhead beyond the original - if a driver has a max_transfer limit, we are bypassing the normal code in bdrv_aligned_preadv() that fragments to that limit, and instead attempt to read the entire buffer from the driver in one go, which some drivers may assert on - a client can request a large request of nearly 2G such that rounding the request out to cluster boundaries results in a byte count larger than 2G. While this cannot exceed 32 bits, it DOES have some follow-on problems: -- the call to bdrv_driver_pread() can assert for exceeding BDRV_REQUEST_MAX_BYTES, if the driver is old and lacks .bdrv_co_preadv -- if the buffer is all zeroes, the subsequent call to bdrv_co_do_pwrite_zeroes is a no-op due to a negative size, which means we did not actually copy on read Fix all of these issues by breaking up the action into a loop, where each iteration is capped to sane limits. Also, querying the allocation status allows us to optimize: when data is already present in the active layer, we don't need to bounce. Note that the code has a telling comment that copy-on-read should probably be a filter driver rather than a bolt-on hack in io.c; but that remains a task for another day. CC: qemu-stable@nongnu.org Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Make bdrv_is_allocated() byte-based We are gradually moving away from sector-based interfaces, towards byte-based. In the common case, allocation is unlikely to ever use values that are not naturally sector-aligned, but it is possible that byte-based values will let us be more precise about allocation at the end of an unaligned file that can do byte-based access. Changing the signature of the function to use int64_t *pnum ensures that the compiler enforces that all callers are updated. For now, the io.c layer still assert()s that all callers are sector-aligned on input and that *pnum is sector-aligned on return to the caller, but that can be relaxed when a later patch implements byte-based block status. Therefore, this code adds usages like DIV_ROUND_UP(,BDRV_SECTOR_SIZE) to callers that still want aligned values, where the call might reasonbly give non-aligned results in the future; on the other hand, no rounding is needed for callers that should just continue to work with byte alignment. For the most part this patch is just the addition of scaling at the callers followed by inverse scaling at bdrv_is_allocated(). But some code, particularly bdrv_commit(), gets a lot simpler because it no longer has to mess with sectors; also, it is now possible to pass NULL if the caller does not care how much of the image is allocated beyond the initial offset. Leave comments where we can further simplify once a later patch eliminates the need for sector-aligned requests through bdrv_is_allocated(). For ease of review, bdrv_is_allocated_above() will be tackled separately. Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
2 years ago
block: Honor BDRV_REQ_FUA during write_zeroes The block layer has a couple of cases where it can lose Force Unit Access semantics when writing a large block of zeroes, such that the request returns before the zeroes have been guaranteed to land on underlying media. SCSI does not support FUA during WRITESAME(10/16); FUA is only supported if it falls back to WRITE(10/16). But where the underlying device is new enough to not need a fallback, it means that any upper layer request with FUA semantics was silently ignoring BDRV_REQ_FUA. Conversely, NBD has situations where it can support FUA but not ZERO_WRITE; when that happens, the generic block layer fallback to bdrv_driver_pwritev() (or the older bdrv_co_writev() in qemu 2.6) was losing the FUA flag. The problem of losing flags unrelated to ZERO_WRITE has been latent in bdrv_co_do_write_zeroes() since commit aa7bfbff, but back then, it did not matter because there was no FUA flag. It became observable when commit 93f5e6d8 paved the way for flags that can impact correctness, when we should have been using bdrv_co_writev_flags() with modified flags. Compare to commit 9eeb6dd, which got flag manipulation right in bdrv_co_do_zero_pwritev(). Symptoms: I tested with qemu-io with default writethrough cache (which is supposed to use FUA semantics on every write), and targetted an NBD client connected to a server that intentionally did not advertise NBD_FLAG_SEND_FUA. When doing 'write 0 512', the NBD client sent two operations (NBD_CMD_WRITE then NBD_CMD_FLUSH) to get the fallback FUA semantics; but when doing 'write -z 0 512', the NBD client sent only NBD_CMD_WRITE. The fix is do to a cleanup bdrv_co_flush() at the end of the operation if any step in the middle relied on a BDS that does not natively support FUA for that step (note that we don't need to flush after every operation, if the operation is broken into chunks based on bounce-buffer sizing). Each BDS gains a new flag .supported_zero_flags, which parallels the use of .supported_write_flags but only when accessing a zero write operation (the flags MUST be different, because of SCSI having different semantics based on WRITE vs. WRITESAME; and also because BDRV_REQ_MAY_UNMAP only makes sense on zero writes). Also fix some documentation to describe -ENOTSUP semantics, particularly since iscsi depends on those semantics. Down the road, we may want to add a driver where its .bdrv_co_pwritev() honors all three of BDRV_REQ_FUA, BDRV_REQ_ZERO_WRITE, and BDRV_REQ_MAY_UNMAP, and advertise this via bs->supported_write_flags for blocks opened by that driver; such a driver should NOT supply .bdrv_co_write_zeroes nor .supported_zero_flags. But none of the drivers touched in this patch want to do that (the act of writing zeroes is different enough from normal writes to deserve a second callback). Signed-off-by: Eric Blake <eblake@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Fam Zheng <famz@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stefan Hajnoczi <stefanha@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Kevin Wolf <kwolf@redhat.com>
3 years ago